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Instructor: John Henderson JT@grar.com

0:49Minutes

Module 1 Lesson 1 – Lead Based Paint Findings

 

Regarding lead poisoning, Congress found that:

Possibly 3 million young children in the US were affected by lead poisoning. Minority and low-income communities were disproportionately affected. Lead poisoning may cause IQ deficiencies, reading and learning disabilities. Homes built prior to 1980 contained 3 million tons of lead in its paint. Risks related to lead can be reduced by abating lead-based paint from homes.

The Congress finds that—

(1)

low-level lead poisoning is widespread among American children, afflicting as many as 3,000,000 children under age 6, with minority and low-income communities disproportionately affected;

(2)

at low levels, lead poisoning in children causes intelligence quotient deficiencies, reading and learning disabilities, impaired hearing, reduced attention span, hyperactivity, and behavior problems;

(3)

pre-1980 American housing stock contains more than 3,000,000 tons of lead in the form of lead-based paint, with the vast majority of homes built before 1950 containing substantial amounts of lead-based paint;

(4)

the ingestion of household dust containing lead from deteriorating or abraded lead-based paint is the most commoncause of lead poisoning in children;

(5)

the health and development of children living in as many as 3,800,000 American homes is endangered by chipping or peeling lead paint, or excessive amounts of lead-contaminated dust in their homes;

(6)

the danger posed by lead-based paint hazards can be reduced by abating lead-based paint or by taking interim measures to prevent paint deterioration and limit children’s exposure to lead dust and chips;

(7)

despite the enactment of laws in the early 1970’s requiring the Federal Government to eliminate as far as practicable lead-based paint hazards in federally owned, assisted, and insured housing, the Federal response to this national crisis remains severely limited; and

(8)

the Federal Government must take a leadership role in building the infrastructure—including an informed public, State and local delivery systems, certified inspectors, contractors, and laboratories, trained workers, and available financing and insurance—necessary to ensure that the national goal of eliminating lead-based paint hazards in housing can be achieved as expeditiously as possible.